Friday, February 3, 2017

One Question With Chrys Fey + Free Ebook + Giveaway

Hey, everyone. Today, the spotlight is on author Chrys Fey, who is celebrating her latest release, Tsunami Crimes. (Congratulations, Chrys!)

She asked the participants of her blog tour to ask one question each.

Here's mine:

MJ’s Question for Chrys: What is your preferred writing method? Are you an old-school pen-and-paper person, or do you trend toward more "modern" methods of writing (i.e., Scrivener, or voice dictation programs, etc.)?


I’m old-school. For every story I write, I always have a notebook for it. I carry it around my house wherever I go, in case inspiration strikes or for those moments when I’m lounging on the couch with nothing better to do than write while I watch TV. I keep every notebook, too. I have them all in boxes in my closet. Now before you think my closet is full of these boxes, let me correct you. There are currently three small boxes. Just three. Well, that’s a lie. I also have a backpack.
Aside from the notebooks, I do have a desktop computer and a laptop. Depending on the story, I may write most of it at my desk or at my kitchen table with my laptop. For Tsunami Crimes, I wrote it entirely at my kitchen table. For some other stories, I find the inspiration to write them while at my desk. I don’t know why this is, but I’ve found that if I start writing a story on my laptop, I can’t write it at all at my desk. And vice-versa.
I’ve never actually tried Scrivener or voice dictation programs or anything else. Truthfully, I can’t even think of another modern writing method. I’ve heard many great things about Scrivener, but I’ve never tried it out. My old-school method works for me, so why fix something that’s not broken?
What methods do you use?


BLURB:
Beth and Donovan have come a long way from Hurricane Sabrina and the San Francisco earthquake. Now they are approaching their wedding day and anxiously waiting to promise each other a lifetime of love. The journey down the aisle isn’t smooth, though, as they receive threats from the followers of the notorious criminal, Jackson Storm. They think they’ll be safe in Hawaii, but distance can’t stop these killers. Not even a tsunami can.
This monstrous wave is the most devastating disaster Beth has ever faced. It leaves her beaten, frightened. Is she a widow on her honeymoon? As she struggles to hold herself together and find Donovan, she’s kidnapped by Jackson's men.
Fearing her dead, Donovan searches the rubble and shelters with no luck. The thought of her being swept out to sea is almost too much for him to bear, but the reality is much worse. She’s being used as bait to get him to fall into a deadly trap.
If they live through this disaster, they may never be the same again.


On SALE for $2.99!


BUY LINKS:

P.S. Hurricane Crimes and Seismic Crimes are on sale for 99 Cents!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:


Chrys Fey is the author of the Disaster Crimes Series. She is a blogger, reader, auntie, vegetarian, and cat Lover. 


FIND CHRYS:
Facebook / Twitter / Blog / Website / Amazon / Goodreads





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18 comments:

  1. I was always old-school, too, when I used to be a novelist. Initially, it was because I had to--grew up computer-less--but over time, it was just nice to have part of the process not involve a computer screen. (Much less strain on the eyes that way!) Great to see another writer who enjoys the pen-and-paper method!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I started out writing in notebooks, so there's something special about it, to me. :)

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  2. I looked at Scrivener but it just confused me. I'd rather type on my desktop or write in a notebook.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Writing is hard enough without confusing software.

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  3. Thank you so much for having me on your blog, MJ! I'm happy to be here. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Happy to have you here, Chrys. Come back any time. :)

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  4. I mostly type, but there were a few times I wrote out a story. It never lasted long because my hand would get tired.

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    Replies
    1. Funny thing...my hand only hurts when I'm writing something verbatim, like notes or research. I guess I give my hand a break when I write my stories by hand.

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  5. I love notebooks. I find it fascinating to look back at them and see the early stages of something that was later published, seeing how much they varied from the original idea. Congrats on the book, Chrys!

    Hi, M.J :-)

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    Replies
    1. And fascinating to see my awful handwriting. :P

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  6. I did purchase some software for writing, but I never figured out how to use them once I got my paws on Word. I don't write stories because my brain is faster than my hand and my hand has a tendency toward carpal tunnel syndrome.

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  7. Interesting! I always use to start poems by hand, in journals and on scraps of paper, and other types of writing (blogs, essays, stories, novels, etc.) would be done onscreen. But writing by hand has become harder for me (arthritis), so I've had to make the transfer to computer for everything. I write a lot less poetry than I used to. I don't know if it's a shift in focus for myself, or a shift in process that isn't as receptive to poetry.

    @mirymom1 from
    Balancing Act

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    Replies
    1. I fear one day I'll have bad arthritis in my hands like my mom does.

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  8. I used to handwrite my first drafts, but now I go straight to the laptop every time. I can type so much faster than I can write now, and my hand doesn't get tired as quickly.

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    Replies
    1. I type really fast, too. That is nice. :)

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  9. I guess if the muse hits at the desk, the muse will only appear while you're at your desk.

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  10. I'm both. I draft by hand, then use Scrivener to rewrite and word to edit. ^_^

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